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How to Install a Closet Rod on Your Slanted Ceiling

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If your closet has a slanted ceiling, don’t assume installing a clothes rod is hopeless. Wooden hanger manufacturers make high-quality hangers suitable for cramped spaces in closets with slanted and regular ceilings.

In short, if you have the will, there is a way. Let’s take a look at a few tips from wooden hanger manufacturers that will help you install a closet rod in a space with a slanted ceiling.

Don’t be Intimidated by the Installation Process

If you are like most people who have a slanted ceiling in your closet or attic, you are uneasy about adding a rod. Keep in mind that clothes rods must hold a considerable amount of weight. If you do not correctly install the rod, it will collapse. Spend a little time preparing for this project, and it will work out in the end.

Mind the Wall Height

You can add a closet rod to your slanted ceiling when the walls perpendicular to the ceiling are 42 inches in height or less. Such short walls are often referred to as knee walls. The figure of 42 inches is used as a reference height. It is a suitable position for the lower portion of a double hang closet. Furthermore, this is also the shortest height for the clothing worn by full-grown adults.

Don’t Worry About a Ceiling With an Especially Steep Slope

If the ceiling’s slope is steep, the rod will be far away from the room’s edge. This spacing is not a problem. You can add shelves behind the area where clothes hang to maximize the available space.

A Cleat System is Your Friend

Positioning the closet rod mounted to the ceiling against the slanted ceiling’s flat surface can prove challenging. However, a cleat system will make this challenge significantly easier.

The word “cleat” refers to a piece of wood that is five inches in width and ¾ inches high, spanning the ceiling’s entire length where the rod is positioned. If you merely have a 2 x 4, it will suffice as a cleat, yet a thinner and broader material will prove optimal. Ideally, the cleat will be matched to the shelves or other closet components.

Opt for a cleat, and the rod brackets will be screwed directly into this wood instead of the drywall. This method ensures you tap into the studs/rafters’ strength to support the clothes’ weight. Be sure to add screws between every 16 and 24 inches of the cleat to keep it firmly connected to the ceiling.

Carefully Position the Rods

The positioning of the rods is of the utmost importance. If the rods are not properly positioned, there will be insufficient room to allow the hangers to swing freely as designed by wooden hanger manufacturers. Furthermore, there is also a chance the longer garments will bunch up at the bottom of the floor if the rods aren’t positioned correctly. The slope of the ceiling in question ultimately determines the position of the rods. Hold up the most extended piece of clothing while it is on the hanger, and you will have a good idea of where the rod should be placed.

Mind the Spacing

Be sure to keep an extra four inches to accommodate the drop between the ceiling and the rod. This additional space is necessary to permit the placement and removal of the hangers from the rod above. At this point, you can mark the ceiling in the position where the rod will be positioned.

Rod Brackets Should Be Added at 30-inch Intervals

The installation of rod brackets every 30 inches will adequately support the rod. Such spacing stops the rod from bending beneath the clothes’ weight. If necessary, it is possible to have less than 30 inches between the brackets to create even spacing. Still, the spacing should not exceed 30-inch intervals.

Move the Rod Through the Holders

Once the cleat and brackets are added, it is time to move the rod through the brackets. If everything is installed correctly, the closet rod will tolerate the weight of your clothing.

However, the proper pole must match the brackets. Avoid attempting to mix and match the brackets and bar between different vendors. You won’t have to worry about an improper fit. When in doubt, opt for the rod of the highest possible quality to ensure it holds steady across posterity.

If your closet has a slanted ceiling, do not assume you cannot install a rod to hang your clothes. Wooden hanger manufacturers make high-quality hangers suitable for cramped spaces both in closets with slanted ceilings and closets with regular ceilings.

In short, if you have the will, there is a way. Let’s take a look at a few tips from wooden hanger manufacturers that will help you install a closet rod in a space with a slanted ceiling.

Don’t be Intimidated by the Installation Process

If you are like most people who have a slanted ceiling in your closet or attic, you are uneasy about adding a rod. Keep in mind that clothes rods must hold a considerable amount of weight. If you do not correctly install the rod, it will collapse. Spend a little time preparing for this project, and it will work out in the end.

Mind the Wall Height

You can add a closet rod to your slanted ceiling when the walls perpendicular to the ceiling are 42 inches in height or less. Such short walls are often referred to as knee walls. The figure of 42 inches is used as a reference height. It is a suitable position for the lower portion of a double hang closet. Furthermore, this is also the shortest height for the clothing worn by full-grown adults.

Don’t Worry About a Ceiling With an Especially Steep Slope

If the ceiling’s slope is steep, the rod will be far away from the room’s edge. This spacing is not a problem. You can add shelves behind the area where clothes hang to maximize the available space.

A Cleat System is Your Friend

Positioning the closet rod mounted to the ceiling against the slanted ceiling’s flat surface can prove challenging. However, a cleat system will make this challenge significantly easier.

The word “cleat” refers to a piece of wood that is five inches in width and ¾ inches high, spanning the ceiling’s entire length where the rod is positioned. If you merely have a 2 x 4, it will suffice as a cleat, yet a thinner and broader material will prove optimal. Ideally, the cleat will be matched to the shelves or other closet components.

Opt for a cleat, and the rod brackets will be screwed directly into this wood instead of the drywall. This method ensures you tap into the studs/rafters’ strength to support the clothes’ weight. Be sure to add screws between every 16 and 24 inches of the cleat to keep it firmly connected to the ceiling.

Carefully Position the Rods

The positioning of the rods is of the utmost importance. If the rods are not properly positioned, there will be insufficient room to allow the hangers to swing freely as designed by wooden hanger manufacturers. Furthermore, there is also a chance the longer garments will bunch up at the bottom of the floor if the rods aren’t positioned correctly. The slope of the ceiling in question ultimately determines the position of the rods. Hold up the most extended piece of clothing while it is on the hanger, and you will have a good idea of where the rod should be placed.

Mind the Spacing

Be sure to keep an extra four inches to accommodate the drop between the ceiling and the rod. This additional space is necessary to permit the placement and removal of the hangers from the rod above. At this point, you can mark the ceiling in the position where the rod will be positioned.

Rod Brackets Should Be Added at 30-inch Intervals

The installation of rod brackets every 30 inches will adequately support the rod. Such spacing stops the rod from bending beneath the clothes’ weight. If necessary, it is possible to have less than 30 inches between the brackets to create even spacing. Still, the spacing should not exceed 30-inch intervals.

Move the Rod Through the Holders

Once the cleat and brackets are added, it is time to move the rod through the brackets. If everything is installed correctly, the closet rod will tolerate the weight of your clothing.

However, the proper pole must match the brackets. Avoid attempting to mix and match the brackets and bar between different vendors. You won’t have to worry about an improper fit. When in doubt, opt for the rod of the highest possible quality to ensure it holds steady across posterity.

Butler Hangers is at Your Service

If you are on the prowl for wholesale wooden hangers, Butler Hangers has you covered. Reach out to us today to browse our selection of wire, plastic, and wood options for all your storage needs.

Contact us by dialing (805) 963-9442. If you would like to reach us by email, send a message to sales@butlerhangers. We can’t wait to hear from you!

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